storyline.

“Monticello Rd.” via Piedmont Council for the Arts’ Facebook page.

Every so often, I am fortunate to come across something that seamlessly blends my most passionate pursuits and interests: youth advocacy, education, community engagement, the arts, and Charlottesville.

Allow me to introduce you to the Storyline Project. Their mission is simple:

“Teams of campers and volunteers will use creative inquiry, historical information from local experts, and in-person interviews to make portraits of people from the community, and to explore real and imagined stories about Monticello Road’s past, present, and future.”

This project allows students to make sense of their own histories as well as begin the process of understanding the subjectivity of their experiences through comparison, all while incorporating a hands-on and community-oriented approach.

It is this exact sort of activity that is most needed—and often sorely lacking—in the classroom. By blending their personal narratives and applying those to historical events and the current community, children learn a number of critical lessons pertaining to historical studies, sociology, writing composition (through story formation), geometry and proportion (through drawing figures), as well as how to function as members of society.

Admittedly, this particular project may be a little out-of-reach for many school budgets, but there are a number of elements that could easily translate into our current educational model for very little cost to the school. Consider:

  • Utilizing school grounds, rather than taking a field trip.
  • Obtaining historical information online and allowing another teacher or school official to present the information in order to offer a “new” perspective.
  • Collaborating between classrooms for peer interviews.
  • Using crayon and long sheets of paper (instead of chalk) to create the community “storyline” mural.

Be sure to check out the Piedmont Council for the Arts’ Facebook album to see more photos and offer some kind feedback!

The full mural, via Charlottesville, Virginia’s Facebook page.

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